Greater Bamboo Lemur


$1 for One.  Support the extraordinary work of Association Mitsinjo in Madagascar by purchasing a SpeeZees Greater Bamboo Lemur t-shirt in Pastel Pink or Chocolate.  Made from 100% GOTS certified organic cotton.  SpeeZees is all about bringing attention to species we love, one t-shirt at a time. 

$1 for OneSupport the extraordinary work of Association Mitsinjo in Madagascar by purchasing a SpeeZees Greater Bamboo Lemur t-shirt in Pastel Pink or Chocolate.  Made from 100% GOTS certified organic cotton. 

SpeeZees is all about bringing attention to species we love, one t-shirt at a time. 

Scientific Name:  Prolemur simus
IUCN Status: Critically Endangered
Population estimate: Less than 140

Region: The Greater Bamboo Lemur’s current range is restricted to southeastern Madagascar, notably in the rainforests of Ranomafana and Andringitra National Parks.
Habitat:  Greater Bamboo Lemurs depend on giant bamboo trees found in these rainforests, small patches of the eastern rainforest belt as well as in some peripheral fragments of degraded forest habitat.
Greatest threats to its continuation:  The Greater Bamboo Lemur is endangered by slash and burn farming, mining, bamboo and other logging, and slingshot hunting. 

Greater Babmoo Lemur, Ranomafana National Park.  Inaki Relanzon, Nature Picture Library.

Did you know?

The Greater Bamboo Lemur, Prolemur simus, is the largest of Madagascar’s bamboo-eating lemurs.  

The Greater Bamboo Lemur is the most critically endangered lemur in Madagascar and one of the world's most critically endangered primates (IUCN Red List).

For more than a century, the Greater Bamboo Lemur was believed to be extinct in almost all Madagascar, except for a remnant population in the south-east of the island.

Greater Bamboo Lemurs live in groups of up to 28.  Individuals are extremely gregarious.

The extensive vocal repertoire of at least seven distinct calls is thought to be linked to the Greater Bamboo Lemur’s relatively large group size.

Historical records and sub-fossil remains confirm that Greater Bamboo Lemurs were once widespread throughout Madagascar but today occupy as little as 1–4% of its former range.  Remaining populations are very patchily distributed. 

  $1 from every SpeeZees Greater Bamboo Lemur tee supports Andasibe, Madagascar-based Association Mitsinjo, an established NGO promoting conservation, ecotourism and community health issues.

If you'd like to make a donation to Association Mitsinjo click here.

Check out this great article on this fascinating primate of Madagascar: 

http://www.mitsinjo.org/greater-bamboo-lemur

Check out this film of Evariste, one of Mitsinjo's expert guides, as talks about the re-forestation and takes us around the forests of eastern Madagascar.

Evariste, one of Mitsinjo's expert guides, talks about the re-forestation project undertaken by Mitsinjo whereby new corridors comprising primary rainforest species are painstakingly grown and planted to relink three separate forest fragments in the area around Andasibe in eastern Madagascar that have long been separated by deforestation.

Evariste takes us around the forest to meet some of its inhabitants - the Indri, Madagascar's largest surviving lemur, brown lemurs, and Parson's chameleons.  View video: 
In 2004, thanks to the intrepid Jean Rafalimandimby, Mitsinjo excitingly discovered a new population of the Greater Bamboo Lemur in Torotorofotsy, reconfirming that this critically endangered bamboo specialist species still holds on in areas where it had gone unnoticed for so long.

In 2004, thanks to the intrepid Jean Rafalimandimby, Mitsinjo excitingly discovered a new population of the Greater Bamboo Lemur in Torotorofotsy, reconfirming that this critically endangered bamboo specialist species still holds on in areas where it had gone unnoticed for so long.